Light/Breezes

Light/Breezes
SUNRISE AT DEATH VALLEY-Photo by Tom Cochrun

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

GENERATIONS OF THE TIE-DYE NATION

GROWING, CALIFORNIA STYLE
    26 Years has brought changes to a California music tradition.
   Live Oak, a project of San Luis Obispo public radio station KCBX has filled the oak forests and wilderness between the San Raphael and Santa Ynez  mountains with California and independent music in a Father's Day weekend festival that has not only become tradition, but a generational matter.
    Live Oak is the best of the Tie-Dye nation-Peace, Love and Dirt, as they say. There's been a lot of love. Each year new generations of Live Oakers appear.
   People have dated or met at Live Oak, fallen in love and so the Live Oak demographics keep growing.  Grand parents to grand kids, Live Oak is a festival of smiles, mellow moods and great music-acoustic, country, jazz, gospel, blue grass, new grass, Mexican, California home grown, and genre bending artistry from bigger names to up and comers.
   It's a picnic under the oaks, and for those who camp or 
RV, it's a jam session that never ends.

   Acts play the main stage, a hot licks stage and Stage Too
 here under more oaks, where the artists answer questions and discuss their writing, recording and try out new material.
  Amidst the name sake Live Oaks, napping brings a particular style-

    This is a particularly telling moment from Live Oak.  The kilted man, sans shirt, and his buddy protect a watermelon  especially prepared with an adult beverage. He glady shared spoonfuls or sipping straws with friends. When little Live Oakers expressed an interest, the fellow wondered to a concession stand and returned with slushies. Kids and parents were satisfied.

   Live Oak is a music festival that is family friendly and entertaining at every turn.
ALSO HOME GROWN
the garden report
   Despite our drought, a week of record setting heat and an invasion of cucumber beetles, Lana's crop of fava beans
has been impressive. Here's a portion of one's days harvest.
The inner husks on the right.
    I rhapsodized about favas in a previous post--the art of the second shuck- including an upclose look at a method of shelling and husking. Though Lana and daughter Katherine swear a quick blanching makes it easier, it seems somehow "less athletic." Still, what a product!

  See you down the trail.

3 comments:

  1. I'd love to attend a Live Oak Music Festival one of these days. Fava beans I can pass on. I was forced to eat too many of them as a kid.

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  2. I ate his liver with fava beans,and a nice chianti........Dr. Hannibal Lechter

    Coudn't resist, sorry.

    The festival looked like fun, at to the tye dye...."those were the days, my friend, we thought they'd never end..."

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